YANNIS RITSOS-POEMS, Selected Books, Volume II

ΦΑΙΔΡΑ/PHAEDRA

(Απόσπασμα-Excerpt IX)

Για τούτο
σου ζητάω ένα γαλάζιο φτερό· — μη θαρρείς για τους ώμους μου βέβαια,
απλώς για το καπέλο μου. Μπορεί κι εσύ πότε πότε
να σκέφτεσαι έτσι. Ίσως κι εσύ να το ξέρεις:
τα πιο όμορφα πράγματα τα λέμε συνήθως
για ν’ αποφύγουμε να πούμε μιαν αλήθεια· κι ίσως
αυτή η αποσιωπημένη αλήθεια να ’ναι που δίνει
τη μεγάλη ομορφιά κι αοριστία
σ’ αυτά τα τετριμμένα ξένα λόγια — αιώνιος νόμος
της ομορφιάς που λένε.
Η αοριστία πάντα
μαρτυράει κάτι βαθύ κι ορισμένο —πιθανόν τραγικό ή και κτηνώδες— μια θυσιασμένη επιθυμία,
λερναία επιθυμία· — διασκεδάζει να κρύβει
σε ρόδινα ή σε πάγχρυσα νέφη
τα νέα κεφάλια της· διασκεδάζει να παίζει
στα νύχια της έναν κόκκινο σπάγγο· να τοποθετεί
τα κομμένα κεφάλια της στον ασημένιο δίσκο στολισμένα με πολύχρωμες ταινίες·
να βγάζει τα καρφιά απ’ τον τοίχο, να τα στήνει ορθά στο κρεβάτι, παίζοντας έτσι
με το δικό μας το μοναδικό κεφάλι, η πολυκέφαλη. Και πια, —τί να κάνουμε;—
αυτό το παιχνίδι μάς αρέσει. Κάποτε, μάλιστα,
το παίζουμε και για λογαριασμό μας (με δική μας τάχατε πρωτοβουλία) —
ο ίδιος κόκκινος σπάγγος, τα κεφάλια στο δίσκο με χρωματιστές κορδέλες,
τα καρφιά στο κρεβάτι.
«Μόνη παρηγόρια
(συνηθίζει να λέει η Τροφός μου) είναι να συλλογιόμαστε μέρα και νύχτα
το θάνατό μας». Μα πότε κι αυτός; Η πραϋντική βεβαιότητά του
ανήκει στο μέλλον μας, ενώ
η πλέον ελάχιστη στιγμή του παρόντος μας, στην όποια αξίωσή της
είναι πιο απόλυτη απ’ το θάνατο.

For this reason

I ask for an ultramarine feather, certainly not for my shoulders,

just for my hat. Perhaps you think in the same way sometimes.

Perhaps you even know that we say the most beautiful things

in order to avoid the truth and perhaps this silenced truth

is what gives absolute beauty and vagueness to these

often repeated strange words — eternal law of beauty

as they call it.

Vagueness always underscores something deep and precise,

perhaps tragic or beastly, a sacrificed desire, strong desire;

it enjoys hiding its new capital in rosy or golden clouds; it

enjoys playing a red thread in its nails; it places its severed

heads on the silver platter decorated with multicolored

ribbons; it enjoys taking the nails off the wall, placing them

on the bed, thus playing with our only head, the multi-headed.

And what can we do, we like this game too. We like

to play it for ourselves (our own initiative) the same red thread,

heads on the platter with colourful ribbons and nails on the bed.

Our only consolation

(my maid usually says) is to think of our death day and night.

But when is it coming? Its relaxed certainty belongs to our

future, while our most precious moment of our present,

which in whichever of its demands is more absolute

than death.